Analysis of dramatic monologue in my

Enamur Rahman Talim A dramatic monologue, traditionally, includes lyrical strain, abrupt beginning, single speaker, silent listener, psychological analysis and clues to suggest what the silent listener says or does. Now we will see how the poem contains all these elements of a dramatic monologue.

Analysis of dramatic monologue in my

In his dramatic monologues, he looks at life from different perspectives. A dramatic monologue usually includes all or a few of the following elements: A tension between sympathy and judgement, a power play between amazement and a sense of morality are among the striking features of dramatic monologue.

A certain dramatic understanding of the person speaking, which implies a certain dramatic sympathy with him, is not only essential, but the final cause of the whole species. The poem carries to the limit an effect peculiarly the genius of the dramatic monologue i.

My Last Duchess

The combination of villain and aesthete in the Duke creates an especially strong tension, and Browning exploits the combination to the fullest. The reader is no less overwhelmed.

Analysis of dramatic monologue in my

Moral judgement, as Robert Langbaum argues, is in fact important as the thing to be suspended, as a measure of the price we pay for the privilege of appreciating to the fullest this extraordinary man It is because the Duke determines the arrangement and relative subordination of the parts that the poem means what it does.

But the next ten lines produce a series of shocks that outstrip each time our understanding of the Duke, and keep us panting after revelation with no opportunity to consolidate our impression of him for moral judgement.

"My Last Duchess" by Robert Browning: Analysis as a Dramatic Monologue

For it is at this point that we learn to whom he has been talking, and he goes on to talk about dowry, even allowing himself to murmur the hypocritical assurance that the new bride herself and not the dowry is of course his object. The nobleman does not hurry on his way to business, the connoisseur cannot resist showing off yet another precious object, the possessive egoist counts up his possessions, even as he moves towards the acquirement of a new possession, a well dowered bride and most important, the last duchess is seen in final perspective.

The duke has taken from her what he wants, her beauty and thrown the life away and we watch in awe as he proceeds to take what he wants from the envoy and by implication form the new duchess.

The Duke grows to his full stature because we allow him to have is way with us; we sub-ordinate all other considerations to the business of understanding him.

It is thus, clear that arguments cannot make the case in a Dramatic Monologue but only passion, power, strength of will and intellect, just those existential virtues which are independent of logical and moral correctness and are therefore, best made out through sympathy and when clearly separated from, even opposed to, the other virtues.

The success of the speaker in doing so is however limited. The typical speaker of a Browning monologue is aggressive, often threatening, nearly always superior intellectually or socially to the auditor, a typically eloquent rhetorician who has complete control over what he speaks.

Yet, such absolute control puts the listener on guard. And the assumption is that what is hidden is hidden for a reason. Language must be examined and studied to uncover the meaning it carries. The confrontation between selves implied in such a process is never far from the surface in a dramatic monologue.

But the listener might not accept the offered world as valid. The poem, therefore, has a metapoetic quality to it. The main device it uses to address its own status as an interpretative form is irony. And irony is the key trope of internal differentiation.

Irony involves distancing language from itself. Thus, reading the monologue often means reading the language of the poem against itself — turning its rhetoric inside out to glimpse what the speaker may, unconsciously or not, be trying to conceal from view.

The attempt to evade the reality of the other as an active agent is an interesting feature that is seen throughout the monologue. The duke can enjoy the blush when it exists within his control. The static thing, the work of art can be controlled in way, the living person cannot be.

The logic of dehumanization is ultimately, the logic of murder. The other who cannot be manipulated must be murdered or else the other will destroy the world the speaker has constructed. But the speaker even while viewing the other as a threat, needs the other.

A total escape from social reality is unsatisfying. But we assume that the satisfaction offered by these inanimate objects cannot be long-lasting.Browning's "My Last Duchess," first published in Dramatic Lyrics in , is one of the best known of his many dramatic monologues.

In the following lesson, students will come to understand the use of dramatic monologue as a poetic device, and they will learn to read beyond the speaker's words in order to understand the implications beneath. Discuss the characteristics of Dramatic Monologue with reference to Browning’s “My Last Duchess”.

Browning wrote poetry with a purpose – to explore the heart and mind of his characters, by making them talk in a particular situation about a . Aug 12,  · My Last Duchess, a dramatic monologue, is a single stanza poem made up of heroic couplets (heroic is a term used for iambic lines), all fully rhyming.

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Lines 1 - 4 The speaker is a man of means, a duke no less, of Ferrara most likely, a town in heartoftexashop.coms: 8. “My Last Duchess” is a fantastic dramatic monologue comp osed by a great Victorian poet Robert Robert Browning. A dramatic monologue, traditionally, includes lyrical strain, abrupt beginning, single speaker, silent listener, psychological analysis and clues to suggest what the silent listener says or does.

The Analysis of Dramatic monologue In My Last Duchess Abstract: Dramatic monologue which is an important poetic form which invented and practiced principally by Robert Browning, Alfred Tennyson, Matthew Arnold in the Victorian Period.

Discuss the characteristics of Dramatic Monologue with reference to Browning’s “My Last Duchess”. Browning wrote poetry with a purpose – to explore the heart and mind of his characters, by making them talk in a particular situation about a certain incident, idea or experience.

Dramatic Monolugue: Browning’s ‘My Last Duchess’ | Survivingbaenglish